Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Top 25 Songs of 2016: #8-7



#8. Glowed Up - Kaytranada (feat. Anderson .Paak): Montreal-based Kaytranada flew onto the global radar this year, collaborating with everyone from Talib Kweli to Chance The Rapper, and eventually winning the Polaris Music Prize. To me, all of this signified that the future of Canadian music, and all of its possibilities, was here. While Canada's been historically pretty well-represented in the rock game and, more recently, the hip-hop game - a brilliant, genre-diverse DJ is something we couldn't really boast about until now. Particularly, a millennial who mind-bogglingly chops soul, R&B and funk samples together like someone who lived through the height of those genres. This track is a perfect example of what we're talking about with Kay's eclectic debut album 99.9%; it's amazing, but by no means representative of everything else on the record. The two-parter slithers around .Paak's fiery sing-rapping - the first half sounding chillingly extraterrestrial, before transitioning into a romantic, acid-jazzy finish. It's a bonafide hip-hop earworm, with a little something for everyone, but is wedged between some electro-jazz fusion and what sounds like an old-school breakdance number. He has so much range, and I really don't get how he knows as much as he does, but I'm beyond proud he's one of our own.


#7. No Problems - Chance The Rapper (feat. Lil Wayne & 2Chainz): And now for the man of the damn year, Chancelor Bennett and Coloring Book, one of the most refreshing hip hop albums of the last decade. Chance has been around for awhile, and avid listeners would remember that he wasn't always the confident, sunshiney fellow he is until last year's Surf, a stunning collaborative album with tons of huge stars and his backing band, Donnie Trumpet & The Social Experiment (name since changed, thanks to another Donald). Following 2013's darker, druggy confessional Acid Rap, which was still obviously incredible, Surf was a gorgeous hip hop experiment that fell deaf on the mainstream's ears, but acted as the prelude to the dynamic then-named "Chance 3" - a mixtape that had been hyped up by new friend Kanye West the second the year started. Once singles like "No Problems" dropped, it was clear that this album was going to be one of the most confident releases by an unsigned artist ever, as evidenced by the subject matter of this track, which is basically a (jolly) double middle finger to anyone who wants Chano to conform. Sure enough, Coloring Book was released independently and on streaming services only - becoming the first album to chart solely based on streams, and the reason The Grammys changed their rules to allow stream-only albums for consideration. This bouncy banger might seem like, well, just that, to anyone who hasn't followed Chano's story, when in reality, it's a forewarning that Chance really only plans to do things his way.



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