Friday, December 30, 2016

Top 25 Songs of 2016: #6-4



6. Love On The Brain - Rihanna: I've always liked Rihanna; she's a talented, versatile, hitmaker who's still wildly successful nearly 14 years after her first single. But. I've never owned an album of hers until this year's Anti, which I knew I would be purchasing the first time I heard the impossibly bad ass "B*tch Better Have My Money." Even though she's always been a bit of a bad ass, it felt as if the dawning of an even badder RiRi era was upon us; a serious rebirth of a new femme fatale that was more rock star than anything else. Sure enough, after Anti's release, that was confirmed - when even chugging doo wop ballads like this one managed to be intimate, vulnerable, kind of grimy and, most of all, chock full of confidence, all at once. From the first few notes of "Love On The Brain," as well as "Higher," I knew we we had a few contemporary R&B classics on our hands here. Similar to some of the great retro soul and R&B artists that likely influenced Rihanna, this round's raw, fearless lyricism and delivery suddenly put her in a class of her own.


5. We The People... - A Tribe Called Quest: Learning that A Tribe Called Quest would be releasing a new album 22 years after their last was maybe one of the most thrilling bits of music news (for me) this year. An album created with Phife Dawg prior to his passing, We Got It from Here... Thank You 4 Your Service was destined to hit hard. From the first buzz and kickdrum of this album opener, it was as if no time had passed; that they were just as triumphant, just as spot-on, as when they asked if they could kick it back in '90. A biting commentary on the state of America then, now and moving forward, ATCQ are still the people's rappers - the sharp, no bullshit boys who, days after Trump's election, swing in with 16 tracks of realness that predicted America's demise long before this album was released.


4. Sister - Angel Olsen: There were any number of tracks off Angel Olsen's breathtaking My Woman that I would have put high, high up on this list - but this one is everything I adore about the album all in one. The sprawling 8-minute track starts close to her Neil Young folk roots - voice shaky, drums skittering, guitar twanging - before thundering into her newest self, a Stevie Nicks-influenced shredder, baring her soul with vocal variations on one line: "All my life I thought I'd change." She spends the better half of the song exploring that concept, but it's not sad - and, similar to the Cat Powers' and Hope Sandovals before her, that's what makes Olsen one of the most authentic rock heroines of our time.

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